Expanding our ranks: Recruiting veterans to Google

Lisa joined Google nine years ago as a recruiting coordinator. As her career grew from coordinator to associate staffing lead, she has spoken with some incredible applicants and worked hard to bring them into Google. As Lisa’s career has developed, so has hiring at Google.

It’s no secret that Google once prized degrees from top universities and cookie cutter experience profiles, but data—and our people—have shown that hiring from a broad range of backgrounds and experiences make us a better company. Lisa was one of the people who helped lead the charge for change.

Six years ago, Lisa came across Mike’s application for a role. At the time, Mike was working for one of Google’s clients, but had an opportunity to come to Google and join the team. He was eager for a change and looking for a more open workplace that would embrace his career goals and MBA work.

Lisa was impressed by Mike’s Army Ranger experience in Iraq, where he led multiple combat missions. Motivated to move fast, she worked with Mike’s hiring manager, Stephanie, to move him through the hiring process—even though he didn’t necessarily have the “traditional” experience.

Lisa worked closely with Mike throughout his interviews, and he ultimately joined Google as an account strategist. Today, he leads an entire strategy and operations team.

After her experience with Mike, Lisa partnered with her colleague Jennifer to start the Veterans Evangelist Program or (VEP), which bridged the gap between people in staffing who were passionate about bringing more veteran talent to Google and VetNet, the Google Veterans Network employee resource group. She wanted to bring together the resources Google offered veterans to prepare for and grow careers at Google. One example is that current vets at Google can make “coaching calls,” helping vets who will be interviewing prepare for the interview experience, knowing they won’t necessarily have the role-related knowledge of someone who has been in business rather than the military. What the vets do have, Lisa says, are transferable skills and traits that often make them good fits for a wide variety of roles in engineering, sales, people operations, analytics, and real estate and workplace services (we call it REWS).

Mike agrees. In business, he says, there’s no close combat, but there are opportunities to lead under pressure. “I’m never going to be as tired, hungry or scared again,” he says of his combat experience. Having military experience “allows me to navigate stressful situations with ease and create a calming effect on the team.”

Vets often have experience in leadership, teamwork and creative problem-solving that make them stand out as candidates and—ultimately—Googlers. To help veterans in the hiring process, Lisa worked on an internal website that provides information for Googlers about how to refer top veteran talent, provides resources for recruiters about how to arrange ambassador calls for veteran candidates going through our interview process, and provides an opportunity for Googlers in VetNet to volunteer to support our vet-hiring efforts.

Mike is on the VetNet steering committee and has participated for more than 5 years. “I didn’t know Employee Resource Groups existed or what they were until my manager steered me in that direction,” he says. Since joining, he has helped recruit and coach veterans.

Looking back at the experiences and resources she helped build, Lisa says, “We’ve made a lot of progress in showing Googlers and veteran applicants that there’s a home for vets here.”

To learn more about VetNet and Veterans hiring at Google, visit our Veterans Careers site. Or, start your search right now.

Expanding our ranks: Recruiting veterans to Google

Lisa joined Google nine years ago as a recruiting coordinator. As her career grew from coordinator to associate staffing lead, she has spoken with some incredible applicants and worked hard to bring them into Google. As Lisa’s career has developed, so has hiring at Google.

It’s no secret that Google once prized degrees from top universities and cookie cutter experience profiles, but data—and our people—have shown that hiring from a broad range of backgrounds and experiences make us a better company. Lisa was one of the people who helped lead the charge for change.

Six years ago, Lisa came across Mike’s application for a role. At the time, Mike was working for one of Google’s clients, but had an opportunity to come to Google and join the team. He was eager for a change and looking for a more open workplace that would embrace his career goals and MBA work.

Lisa was impressed by Mike’s Army Ranger experience in Iraq, where he led multiple combat missions. Motivated to move fast, she worked with Mike’s hiring manager, Stephanie, to move him through the hiring process—even though he didn’t necessarily have the “traditional” experience.

Lisa worked closely with Mike throughout his interviews, and he ultimately joined Google as an account strategist. Today, he leads an entire strategy and operations team.

After her experience with Mike, Lisa partnered with her colleague Jennifer to start the Veterans Evangelist Program or (VEP), which bridged the gap between people in staffing who were passionate about bringing more veteran talent to Google and VetNet, the Google Veterans Network employee resource group. She wanted to bring together the resources Google offered veterans to prepare for and grow careers at Google. One example is that current vets at Google can make “coaching calls,” helping vets who will be interviewing prepare for the interview experience, knowing they won’t necessarily have the role-related knowledge of someone who has been in business rather than the military. What the vets do have, Lisa says, are transferable skills and traits that often make them good fits for a wide variety of roles in engineering, sales, people operations, analytics, and real estate and workplace services (we call it REWS).

Mike agrees. In business, he says, there’s no close combat, but there are opportunities to lead under pressure. “I’m never going to be as tired, hungry or scared again,” he says of his combat experience. Having military experience “allows me to navigate stressful situations with ease and create a calming effect on the team.”

Vets often have experience in leadership, teamwork and creative problem-solving that make them stand out as candidates and—ultimately—Googlers. To help veterans in the hiring process, Lisa worked on an internal website that provides information for Googlers about how to refer top veteran talent, provides resources for recruiters about how to arrange ambassador calls for veteran candidates going through our interview process, and provides an opportunity for Googlers in VetNet to volunteer to support our vet-hiring efforts.

Mike is on the VetNet steering committee and has participated for more than 5 years. “I didn’t know Employee Resource Groups existed or what they were until my manager steered me in that direction,” he says. Since joining, he has helped recruit and coach veterans.

Looking back at the experiences and resources she helped build, Lisa says, “We’ve made a lot of progress in showing Googlers and veteran applicants that there’s a home for vets here.”

To learn more about VetNet and Veterans hiring at Google, visit our Veterans Careers site. Or, start your search right now.