From AdWords to Aprés-Ski; meet Reto Strobl, Engineering Director at Google Zurich

How did you get involved in computer science?
I got into computer science in college after a friend told me about algorithms—that writing a good one was like solving a riddle. I ended up getting a master’s in computer science at ETH Zurich, with specializations in computer vision, cryptography and system engineering. I worked at IBM while getting my PhD, and I built a content management system at a friend’s startup. Then I came to Google eight years ago. I wanted to work here as soon as I heard Google was coming to Switzerland.

What do you do at Google Zurich?
I’m an engineering manager for AdWords for Video. I manage a team of 20+ engineers and collaborate with test engineers and UX designers. I also do a lot of hands-on development. I built this team more than a year ago and AdWords for Video has grown exponentially since we started.

What is your favorite thing about your team and other Googlers?
I love working with such great people. The Googlers on my team are extremely dedicated and collaborative. I guess that’s the norm at Google, of course, but I can’t help but be struck by it every day I work with my team. It’s also pretty fun to see bloggers writing about a technology you’ve worked on—especially as traffic rises. Our teams get to have a huge impact.

Teammates, impact...what else is great about working in Zurich?
Zurich is home to a lot of Googlers. There’s a critical mass here with lots of fascinating people to get to know. Additionally, the location is great. It’s 50 minutes to skiing by train, and we have easy access to 12 of the world’s finest mountains. It’s quite bike-friendly and lots of Zooglers bike to work.

Do you ever get to travel to other Google offices around the world?
We do have to work across time zones and sometimes have to travel to the HQ in Mountain View. I see the cross-country collaboration as a great chance to meet people from around the world and incorporate their perspectives and ideas into my work. And, although it’s not the Alps, I’ll admit the skiing in California is pretty good.

From AdWords to Aprés-Ski; meet Reto Strobl, Engineering Director at Google Zurich

How did you get involved in computer science?
I got into computer science in college after a friend told me about algorithms—that writing a good one was like solving a riddle. I ended up getting a master’s in computer science at ETH Zurich, with specializations in computer vision, cryptography and system engineering. I worked at IBM while getting my PhD, and I built a content management system at a friend’s startup. Then I came to Google eight years ago. I wanted to work here as soon as I heard Google was coming to Switzerland.

What do you do at Google Zurich?
I’m an engineering manager for AdWords for Video. I manage a team of 20+ engineers and collaborate with test engineers and UX designers. I also do a lot of hands-on development. I built this team more than a year ago and AdWords for Video has grown exponentially since we started.

What is your favorite thing about your team and other Googlers?
I love working with such great people. The Googlers on my team are extremely dedicated and collaborative. I guess that’s the norm at Google, of course, but I can’t help but be struck by it every day I work with my team. It’s also pretty fun to see bloggers writing about a technology you’ve worked on—especially as traffic rises. Our teams get to have a huge impact.

Teammates, impact...what else is great about working in Zurich?
Zurich is home to a lot of Googlers. There’s a critical mass here with lots of fascinating people to get to know. Additionally, the location is great. It’s 50 minutes to skiing by train, and we have easy access to 12 of the world’s finest mountains. It’s quite bike-friendly and lots of Zooglers bike to work.

Do you ever get to travel to other Google offices around the world?
We do have to work across time zones and sometimes have to travel to the HQ in Mountain View. I see the cross-country collaboration as a great chance to meet people from around the world and incorporate their perspectives and ideas into my work. And, although it’s not the Alps, I’ll admit the skiing in California is pretty good.