Meet Justin Steele, Principal at Google.org in San Francisco

We asked Justin Steele, Principal at Google.org, about working in San Francisco and what he's passionate about. Check out what he had to say.

Can you tell us about yourself and your work at Google?
I’ve been interested in the intersection of technology and racial justice since I led national programs for the National Society of Black Engineers in college. Currently, my day job is driving our grant portfolios for Google.org, and I’m also a proud Black Googler Network (BGN) member. Last year, I was proud to be a part of our BGN-led Day of Solidarity in response to the Charleston Church Shooting and in support of #BlackLivesMatter. As part of that movement, I spearheaded a $5M commitment from Google.org to support social innovators leading racial justice work. We’ve partnered with leaders like #BlackLivesMatter co-founder Patrisse Cullors and My Brother’s Keeper innovator Chris Chatmon. The response has been inspiring: together, we’re not only advancing racial equity, we are challenging the narrative of racial inferiority and difference.

What do you believe is unique about being at Google that allows for powerful change throughout the world?
Google is an innovation company that values original thinkers and is not afraid to take big bets on risky solutions. Our unique approach to our products extends to how we support the world's most promising social entrepreneurs. We empower them to be bold in their pursuit of social change and bring about a better world, faster. More locally, we want to give local nonprofits the resources and support needed to be similarly bold in their approach to our region’s toughest social challenges.

How do you believe being in San Francisco affects your team's impact?
San Francisco and Oakland are home to some of the country's most innovative social impact organizations. Developing strong relationships with the leaders of these organizations is a huge part of forming an authentic relationship with the local community. Working out of the San Francisco office puts us in close proximity to many of the region's boldest leaders on our toughest social challenges.

Meet Justin Steele, Principal at Google.org in San Francisco

We asked Justin Steele, Principal at Google.org, about working in San Francisco and what he's passionate about. Check out what he had to say.

Can you tell us about yourself and your work at Google?
I’ve been interested in the intersection of technology and racial justice since I led national programs for the National Society of Black Engineers in college. Currently, my day job is driving our grant portfolios for Google.org, and I’m also a proud Black Googler Network (BGN) member. Last year, I was proud to be a part of our BGN-led Day of Solidarity in response to the Charleston Church Shooting and in support of #BlackLivesMatter. As part of that movement, I spearheaded a $5M commitment from Google.org to support social innovators leading racial justice work. We’ve partnered with leaders like #BlackLivesMatter co-founder Patrisse Cullors and My Brother’s Keeper innovator Chris Chatmon. The response has been inspiring: together, we’re not only advancing racial equity, we are challenging the narrative of racial inferiority and difference.

What do you believe is unique about being at Google that allows for powerful change throughout the world?
Google is an innovation company that values original thinkers and is not afraid to take big bets on risky solutions. Our unique approach to our products extends to how we support the world's most promising social entrepreneurs. We empower them to be bold in their pursuit of social change and bring about a better world, faster. More locally, we want to give local nonprofits the resources and support needed to be similarly bold in their approach to our region’s toughest social challenges.

How do you believe being in San Francisco affects your team's impact?
San Francisco and Oakland are home to some of the country's most innovative social impact organizations. Developing strong relationships with the leaders of these organizations is a huge part of forming an authentic relationship with the local community. Working out of the San Francisco office puts us in close proximity to many of the region's boldest leaders on our toughest social challenges.